It’s beginning to look a lot like lockdown

EXCLUSIVE

By Sean Moriarty

Hotels and guesthouses are extremely concerned about the financial impact of Tuesday’s decision by the Government to bring forward the reintroduction of COVID-19 restrictions.

The hotels sector will now be in effective lock-down from the December 27, over a week earlier than expected.

Hospitality sector operators in Killarney say they are tired of the Government’s “in and out and up and down” approach to COVID-19 restrictions.

The Irish Government announced yesterday (Tuesday) a range of new restrictions just as the Killarney Advertiser prepared to go to press early to meet Christmas deadlines.

By late afternoon, businesses in the hospitality sector were left reeling from the official Government announcement which effectively closes the food sector from 3pm on Christmas Eve and the accommodation sector from St Stephen’s Day.

As expected, the Government followed the National Public Health Emergency Team’s (NPHET) advice and placed the country in another Level 5 lockdown until January 12 – ending the festive season for the entire country.

Hotel operators in Killarney and Kerry were frustrated that it took the Government so long to make the call following a rise in COVID-19 cases in Ireland since last week.

It is this uncertainty that is causing the most amount of stress for local hospitality providers.

They need to arrange staff rotas, order in food and drinks – a situation further complicated by some suppliers who will not allow a sale or return service.

“I cannot understand why the guidelines are not clear and concise,” Bernadette Randles, Chair of the Kerry Branch of the Irish Hotels Federation, told the Killarney Advertiser.

She is facing the difficult task of not knowing if she should tell her staff if they have a job or not.

“It is a few days before Christmas Eve. This [staff decisions] is the hardest part for me,” she added.

Adding to her call for better communication from the Government she said: “There needs to be clear decision making – even if that means closing the entire hospitality sector until March – then make that decision and compensate the staff and business owners. But this in and out and up and down approach is helping no-one.”

Other measures that could come into force include the extension of an airline passenger ban from the UK. That was due to expire last night (Tuesday) but it has been extended until at least December 31.

A Ryanair flight from London-Luton was due arrive at Kerry Airport on Christmas Eve but that is now grounded. This will also create problems for Kerry people who are already home and who intend to return to London next week.

Localised travel restrictions have been applied too. Under Level 5, people are restricted to move within their own county bounds’ only.

Scores of Kerry people who work and study in Dublin and other cities are already home to spend time with their families – many have not seen their families at all this year – but they will be allowed to return to their place of normal residency.

By Sean Moriarty

Hotels and guesthouses are extremely concerned about the financial impact of Tuesday’s decision by the Government to bring forward the reintroduction of COVID-19 restrictions.

The hotels sector will now be in effective lock-down from the December 27, over a week earlier than expected.

Hospitality sector operators in Killarney say they are tired of the Government’s “in and out and up and down” approach to COVID-19 restrictions.

The Irish Government announced yesterday (Tuesday) a range of new restrictions just as the Killarney Advertiser prepared to go to press early to meet Christmas deadlines.

By late afternoon, businesses in the hospitality sector were left reeling from the official Government announcement which effectively closes the food sector from 3pm on Christmas Eve and the accommodation sector from St Stephen’s Day.

As expected, the Government followed the National Public Health Emergency Team’s (NPHET) advice and placed the country in another Level 5 lockdown until January 12 – ending the festive season for the entire country.

Hotel operators in Killarney and Kerry were frustrated that it took the Government so long to make the call following a rise in COVID-19 cases in Ireland since last week.

It is this uncertainty that is causing the most amount of stress for local hospitality providers.

They need to arrange staff rotas, order in food and drinks – a situation further complicated by some suppliers who will not allow a sale or return service.

“I cannot understand why the guidelines are not clear and concise,” Bernadette Randles, Chair of the Kerry Branch of the Irish Hotels Federation, told the Killarney Advertiser.

She is facing the difficult task of not knowing if she should tell her staff if they have a job or not.

“It is a few days before Christmas Eve. This [staff decisions] is the hardest part for me,” she added.

Adding to her call for better communication from the Government she said: “There needs to be clear decision making – even if that means closing the entire hospitality sector until March – then make that decision and compensate the staff and business owners. But this in and out and up and down approach is helping no-one.”

Other measures that could come into force include the extension of an airline passenger ban from the UK. That was due to expire last night (Tuesday) but it has been extended until at least December 31.

A Ryanair flight from London-Luton was due arrive at Kerry Airport on Christmas Eve but that is now grounded. This will also create problems for Kerry people who are already home and who intend to return to London next week.

Localised travel restrictions have been applied too. Under Level 5, people are restricted to move within their own county bounds’ only.

Scores of Kerry people who work and study in Dublin and other cities are already home to spend time with their families – many have not seen their families at all this year – but they will be allowed to return to their place of normal residency.
It’s beginning to look a lot like lockdownHotels and guesthouses are extremely concerned about the financial impact of Tuesday’s decision by the Government to bring forward the reintroduction of COVID-19 restrictions.

 

The hotels sector will now be in effective lock-down from the December 27, over a week earlier than expected.
It’s beginning to look a lot like lockdown

EXCLUSIVE

By Sean Moriarty

Hotels and guesthouses are extremely concerned about the financial impact of Tuesday’s decision by the Government to bring forward the reintroduction of COVID-19 restrictions.

The hotels sector will now be in effective lock-down from the December 27, over a week earlier than expected.

Hospitality sector operators in Killarney say they are tired of the Government’s “in and out and up and down” approach to COVID-19 restrictions.

The Irish Government announced yesterday (Tuesday) a range of new restrictions just as the Killarney Advertiser prepared to go to press early to meet Christmas deadlines.

By late afternoon, businesses in the hospitality sector were left reeling from the official Government announcement which effectively closes the food sector from 3pm on Christmas Eve and the accommodation sector from St Stephen’s Day.

As expected, the Government followed the National Public Health Emergency Team’s (NPHET) advice and placed the country in another Level 5 lockdown until January 12 – ending the festive season for the entire country.

Hotel operators in Killarney and Kerry were frustrated that it took the Government so long to make the call following a rise in COVID-19 cases in Ireland since last week.

It is this uncertainty that is causing the most amount of stress for local hospitality providers.

They need to arrange staff rotas, order in food and drinks – a situation further complicated by some suppliers who will not allow a sale or return service.

“I cannot understand why the guidelines are not clear and concise,” Bernadette Randles, Chair of the Kerry Branch of the Irish Hotels Federation, told the Killarney Advertiser.

She is facing the difficult task of not knowing if she should tell her staff if they have a job or not.

“It is a few days before Christmas Eve. This [staff decisions] is the hardest part for me,” she added.

Adding to her call for better communication from the Government she said: “There needs to be clear decision making – even if that means closing the entire hospitality sector until March – then make that decision and compensate the staff and business owners. But this in and out and up and down approach is helping no-one.”

Other measures that could come into force include the extension of an airline passenger ban from the UK. That was due to expire last night (Tuesday) but it has been extended until at least December 31.

A Ryanair flight from London-Luton was due arrive at Kerry Airport on Christmas Eve but that is now grounded. This will also create problems for Kerry people who are already home and who intend to return to London next week.

Localised travel restrictions have been applied too. Under Level 5, people are restricted to move within their own county bounds’ only.

Scores of Kerry people who work and study in Dublin and other cities are already home to spend time with their families – many have not seen their families at all this year – but they will be allowed to return to their place of normal residency.
 

Hospitality sector operators in Killarney say they are tired of the Government’s “in and out and up and down” approach to COVID-19 restrictions.

 

The Irish Government announced yesterday (Tuesday) a range of new restrictions just as the Killarney Advertiser prepared to go to press early to meet Christmas deadlines.

 

By late afternoon, businesses in the hospitality sector were left reeling from the official Government announcement which effectively closes the food sector from 3pm on Christmas Eve and the accommodation sector from St Stephen’s Day.

 

As expected, the Government followed the National Public Health Emergency Team’s (NPHET) advice and placed the country in another Level 5 lockdown until January 12 – ending the festive season for the entire country.

 

Hotel operators in Killarney and Kerry were frustrated that it took the Government so long to make the call following a rise in COVID-19 cases in Ireland since last week.

 

It is this uncertainty that is causing the most amount of stress for local hospitality providers.

 

They need to arrange staff rotas, order in food and drinks – a situation further complicated by some suppliers who will not allow a sale or return service.

 

“I cannot understand why the guidelines are not clear and concise,” Bernadette Randles, Chair of the Kerry Branch of the Irish Hotels Federation, told the Killarney Advertiser.

 

She is facing the difficult task of not knowing if she should tell her staff if they have a job or not.

 

“It is a few days before Christmas Eve. This [staff decisions] is the hardest part for me,” she added.

 

Adding to her call for better communication from the Government she said: “There needs to be clear decision making – even if that means closing the entire hospitality sector until March – then make that decision and compensate the staff and business owners. But this in and out and up and down approach is helping no-one.”

 

Other measures that could come into force include the extension of an airline passenger ban from the UK. That was due to expire last night (Tuesday) but it has been extended until at least December 31.

 

A Ryanair flight from London-Luton was due arrive at Kerry Airport on Christmas Eve but that is now grounded. This will also create problems for Kerry people who are already home and who intend to return to London next week.

 

Localised travel restrictions have been applied too. Under Level 5, people are restricted to move within their own county bounds’ only.

 

Scores of Kerry people who work and study in Dublin and other cities are already home to spend time with their families – many have not seen their families at all this year – but they will be allowed to return to their place of normal residency.